Pharmaceutics & Pharmacology

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Pharmaceutics & Pharmacology

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The mission of the faculty, scientists, students and staff of the Division of Pharmaceutics and Pharmacology is the discovery and development of drug therapies for the treatment of human disease. The training of the next generation of pharmaceutical scientists at the undergraduate (BS), professional (PharmD), and graduate (PhD) levels is intertwined with this mission.

The Division of Pharmaceutics and Pharmacology researchers are leaders in the use of state-of-the-art technologies to conduct research centered around four major themes: (1) cancer therapeutics, (2) cell protective therapies, (3) drug delivery systems, and (4) drug toxicity.

(1) Cancer Therapeutics: the discovery of anti-cancer drug targets, identification of drug resistance mechanisms, and the optimization of drug delivery and disposition are a major area of focus for the Division. Our anti-cancer therapeutics research leverages our expertise in novel drug delivery systems, drug transport and membrane trafficking, pharmacokinetics, data analytics, and basic/translational/clinical pharmacology to improve outcomes for cancer patients.

(2) Cell Protective Therapies: a primary goal of drug discovery in neurologic, cardiovascular and renal diseases is slowing the progression of epithelial cell death. Preclinical studies of mechanisms of cell death and mechanisms of cell survival are important research areas in the Division and this knowledge will contribute to the development of therapies to reduce inflammatory and degenerative processes.

(3) Drug Delivery Systems: as new biologics and cell and gene therapies are being discovered, there is a need for improved strategies to deliver them to the target site in the body. Our research spans expertise in pharmaceutical chemistry, bioengineering and RNA nanotechnology to develop future medicines to improve human disease.

(4) Drug Toxicity: understanding the mechanisms underlying the unwanted and adverse effects of drug therapies is a major area of investigation in the Division. Knowledge of how drugs enter normal cells and exert toxic effects will help the design of strategies to mitigate this damage and improve patient health. Drug transporter and pharmacology principles are integral to this research theme.
 

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2018 Division Accomplishments

101
grants submitted as P-I, MPI, CO-I and collaborators
75
peer reviewed manuscripts
4,778,081
dollars (direct) in research funding for P-Is and CO-Is
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