Faculty Profile: Jennifer L. Rodis, PharmD, BCPS, FAPhA

07/21/2015

Jennifer L. Rodis, PharmD, BCPS, FAPhA  Assistant Dean for Outreach and Engagement Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy Pharmacy Practice and Administration
 
It was 2005, and The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy’s Jen Rodis was faced with a dilemma.
 
 “As a pretty junior faculty member at the time, I found myself frustrated with the dynamic of teaching about patient care in community pharmacy and having students respond with, ‘This sounds great, but where is it really happening,’” said Rodis. “This was a problem. How could we inspire our students to make positive change in healthcare if we didn't equip them with the know-how to do it?”
 
So Rodis and experiential director Jerry Cable, along with support from Kristin Casper and Julie Legg, developed a pilot longitudinal rotation in which Rodis and her students created novel patient care services with community pharmacies. Today, that program, Partner for Promotion (PFP), celebrates 10 successful years and is a model for changing the landscape of pharmacy education.
 
The program started small. “We had seven students and seven pharmacies involved that first year,” said Rodis. “I had a little trouble recruiting students that first year since this was a brand new endeavor.” There were other stumbling blocks, too “I originally planned to have the students in Columbus, meet with them monthly, and work locally. Yet some of my students were interested completing rotations in cities outside Central Ohio. This forced me to think outside the box about how to operationalize the communication and mentoring.” So the program was developed to operate online, allowing PFP to impact pharmacies across the state and the U.S.
 
The program soon caught on. While presenting at a national meeting in 2008, Rodis was approached by a faculty member from the University of Utah who was interested in doing PFP in his home state. That conversation began the process of licensing PFP as an educational model and ultimately sharing it to be used at six different colleges of pharmacy in the U.S.
 
“Jerry Cable, Julie Legg, and Kristin Casper contributed a great deal those first five years and were a huge part of the development of the infrastructure,” said Rodis. “Their perspectives were integral.”
 
Rodis is also quick to praise the retailers who were early adopters of PFP. “The pharmacies involved at the beginning and throughout have been amazing. My biggest partner from the beginning has been Kroger Pharmacy, Columbus Division. The vision their leadership has for community pharmacy is progressive and has been for many years; it has aligned with PFP and that has allowed us to do some very exciting projects together.”
 
So what’s next for PFP? “I believe the next 10 years will be more a focused expansion with a broader perspective on the community pharmacist's engagement in the healthcare team,” said Rodis. “We are looking to pharmacists as healthcare providers, and to do that, we need to consider how community pharmacies engage with the rest of the healthcare team to provide care and contribute to improved health outcomes for individual patients and populations.”
 
“The value of PFP should always come back to the whole point of what we do as pharmacists: enhance the lives of our individual patients. I hope that the ultimate value of this program is to positively impact the health and well-being of our communities through care provided by pharmacists as a part of the healthcare team.”
 
Join us as we celebrate Partner for Promotion 10th Anniversary Celebration with the
Columbus Symphony and The Ohio State University Marching Band at Picnic with the Pops Saturday, August 1. Learn more here: http://pharmacy.osu.edu/outreach/partner-promotion-10th-anniversary